Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
suit or no suit?
#11
Lol! What Mr Sandman said. I wore smart black trousers and a dark jacket that went well with the black trousers, and shirt and tie but not a full suit. And black shoes. I felt more comfortable that way. Smart casual basically. I looked smarter like that than in a suit because my suit is old and baggy with padded shoulders lol. With my job I never need one. I think the main thing is to look smart and in dark subdued colours - nothing flashy.

I was trying to find an article to link that I read before my final hearing, about what to wear but can't find it. It said smart casual is fine for family courts and you aren't expected to wear a suit. But if you have one it might be an idea. I would definitely wear a tie and black smart shoes.

The main thing is to look conservative and smart. If you don't you draw attention to yourself and it may not be in a positive way. I read something that said the Judge doesn't want to be distracted from your case by noticing what you're wearing. You address the Judge as Sir (or Ma'am) if you speak to them. That might sound funny but it's important! I had a hearing for a non family matter a year or so ago and the court official told me you need to address the Judge as sir, which I did even though it felt very weird. The opponent didn't - turned up an a kagool and didn't call the Judge Sir but just talked to him like he was a bloke in the pub and the Judge was noticeably miffed. You also call your barrister Mr or Mrs whatever in court too (not first names) but first names out of court.

Also read advice to be polite and respectful to all court officials, not just the Judge. The psychology is important. The court officials are in and out talking to the Judges a lot, during and between cases and if they don't like you they may say something! Also be relaxed and not worry. A bit like a job interview really.
Reply
#12
Cheers Charlie, yeah Ive got all that down, had to call the judges "your worship" at the first hearing, what does that mean? district judges?
I have to wear suits for work in consultancy so definitely wearing my lucky fitted suit now with favourite brown shoes [although some toff told me recently brown shoes means middle management humfff]
Since Ive lost nearly two stone from the start of all this it now fits perfectly. Does anyone need double glazing?
Reply
#13
If it's "your worships", you're in front of magistrates; if it's a judge you are supposed to use "your honour". But actually whoever they are, if you use "sir" or "madam" and speak respectfully you'll be fine. They won't be that bothered about whether you know exactly the right court etiquette. My ex's solicitor preceeded just about every statement she made with "your worships" in a way that made her sound pathetically ingratiating rather than respectful, so I deliberately avoided using it.
Reply
#14
Ah, interesting. They asked me a question at the first hearing and I asked my solicitor if I were allowed to address them directly. I think they liked that, it all goes well until the ex opens her mouth and starts complicating things.
Reply
#15
It does sound ingratiating and archaic and cap doffing and I didn't like the idea at all but they do expect it and it would be seriously bad etiquette not to apparently! Court is another world. I guess it's like having to address the Queen a certain way. I think generally you don't address them directly unless they ask you a question. I think psychologically they like to see you are capable of being respectful. I dunno! My Dad always said never wear brown shoes if it's important lol!
Reply
#16
(04-20-2018, 12:40 PM)Charlie7000 Wrote: It does sound ingratiating and archaic and cap doffing and I didn't like the idea at all but they do expect it and it would be seriously bad etiquette not to apparently!  Court is another world.  I guess it's like having to address the Queen a certain way.  I think generally you don't address them directly unless they ask you a question.  I think psychologically they like to see you are capable of being respectful.  I dunno!  My Dad always said never wear brown shoes if it's important lol!

FFS
Just when I'd finally made a decision about shoes you throw that one in there. Thanks Dad
Reply
#17
Having done some work for a tailor and learning all the proper dress etiquette you end up always breaking at least one rule

From the sleeves of your suit jacket your shirt cuffs should only protrude 1/8th of an inch.

Was told "never brown when in town" brown shoes were apparently for "the Italians or for those gentleman who frequent the countryside, black shoes only when in town.

Made me feel like a bum haha
Reply
#18
I think the only reason black is considered more formal is it's less noticeable. Probably doesn't matter. I know I got a bit stressed about shoes as don't have any smart black ones so wore slip on suede ones. But because they were so black it wasn't noticeable :-) They were only black enough not to be noticeable after I used marker pen on them :-)
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Ex moving goal posts to suit cheesy time 1 2,829 05-30-2018, 07:10 AM
Last Post: MarkR
  It's stated, changing to suit harrison404 5 5,528 01-30-2018, 11:34 AM
Last Post: Charlie7000



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)