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Litigant in person
#1
Hi all,

My ex and I have reached a point where court is the only way to sort out splitting our finances.
I should say at this point that we were a very average couple with an average financial situation (not millionaires or anything like that!). We also have a 7 year old daughter that lives with my ex (she stays with me often though ?)

I've decided to represent myself in family court, as the cost of getting my solicitor to represent me will be expensive to say the least.

My question is this, has anybody here been a "litigant in person" (represented themselves in court) and could you give me any good tips, info etc or even just your own personal experience on having done this for yourself?

Thanks in advance ?
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#2
(04-08-2016, 06:21 AM)Andy74 Wrote: Hi all,

My ex and I have reached a point where court is the only way to sort out splitting our finances.
I should say at this point that we were a very average couple with an average financial situation (not millionaires or anything like that!). We also have a 7 year old daughter that lives with my ex (she stays with me often though ?)

I've decided to represent myself in family court, as the cost of getting my solicitor to represent me will be expensive to say the least.

My question is this, has anybody here been a "litigant in person" (represented themselves in court) and could you give me any good tips, info etc or even just your own personal experience on having done this for yourself?

Thanks in advance ?

While I have not had to do this, I do now about how the Chld Support side of it works.

Bear in mind that what your ex earns, benefits she gets and any settlement will not be considered for Child Support.

What will be considered is your ability to pay but it does take into account how long you look after your daughter for, as your supporting her during that time.

It might be worth taking a look at the calculator, https://www.gov.uk/calculate-your-child-maintenance/y

I would not agree to any Child Support amount until contact arrangements are in place, in a format you can prove (Court Order, Mediantion Agreement or even just wrote down and signed by you and your ex).
Posts made by me are my opinion and any factual information should be checked out. If you do not have a Solicitor, often your local CAB can get you some initial advice.
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#3
Andy...re being LiP.

Be smart, dress accordingly, arrive early. Tell the court clerk who you are and they'll mark you off on the list. Once in chambers, or court, address your remarks to the judge, not your ex.

Before you go in make sure you know what to expect, prepare beforehand, read up on any relevant material, make sure all your paperwork is in order.
Don't slag off the ex, it won't do you any good. Keep it focussed on the issues that led you to court in the first place. Remember judges are human too and are acting in what they believe is the best interests of the child, which might not be exactly the same as what you or your ex want.

Above all, remain calm and you'll be fine.
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#4
I like yourself are in this situation and of to court on the 18th , I was advised a good book for Litigants in Person in these situations, Im not sure if its acceptable to post book titles in the forums. As a starter the above information is the most important.

First Impression and only the facts about what you require in term of the best for your children is al that is required. Let Cafcass and the Judge ask the question to highlight the question that could be deemed contentious if you say them. Never assume you know why your partner is being the way they are ( unless you have the facts to hand ), guess work is never great idea with out evidence.
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#5
i found the wikivorce forum very good for financial advice in my divorce in that you can provide anonymous info on the finances and get impartial advice from a good number of experinced forum members on how it may be viewed by a judge should it go the distance.many financial ancillary relief cases often don't go the distance to a final hearing and negotiations continue back and forth before the final hearing as they can be costly if having a solicitor.1st hearing is effectively a directions hearing, for the judge to set out what either parties and the judge need to see before them.it's a often long winded, slow process of negotation , with either party at some point possibly re-evaluating the process of negotiation when they get their first legal bill.
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#6
Thanks for the comments above everyone. Hi Andy 74. We have a section full of articles on the court process including one on representing yourself in court here: http://www.separateddads.co.uk/court-pro...egory.html
Hope you find these useful and let us know how you get on.
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