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What arguments to use
#1
After a year of my ex stopping me from seeing my kids, I have my first child welfare hearing at court this week and will be self representing.

I believe that my is going to say that me seeing my kids again is not going to be in their best interests, that it will affect them emotionally and also cause problems with behaviour and school work. I also believe she is going to have a statement from my eldest saying that she does not want to see me again but I believe this is because my ex has basically brainwashed her as my eldest does not think clearly as only 12 years old and autistic.

What arguments do people use in court? Why is it in the best interest of the children to see their dad after a year other than he is their dad?
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#2
(10-05-2018, 11:11 PM)Bluebear Wrote: After a year of my ex stopping me from seeing my kids, I have my first child welfare hearing at court this week and will be self representing.

I believe that my is going to say that me seeing my kids again is not going to be in their best interests, that it will affect them emotionally and also cause problems with behaviour and school work. I also believe she is going to have a statement from my eldest saying that she does not want to see me again but I believe this is because my ex has basically brainwashed her as my eldest does not think clearly as only 12 years old and autistic.

What arguments do people use in court? Why is it in the best interest of the children to see their dad after a year other than he is their dad?

You need to ask yourself that question - what can you provide your children that your ex can't?

I'd start by pointing out that every child needs a positive male role model in their life, and that person is preferably their natural father for the emotional support and connection. What have you done over the last 12 months to give them that assurance? Have you held down a job? Have you achieved things outside of work etc?

What's around where you live, activities that are chid-focused etc, what's your house like compared to hers, can it offer a stable environment for them to grow etc

Your child of 12 will likely be asked about their "wishes and feelings" so you need to take that into account - if you have evidence of the parental alienation, I would use that
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