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Parental Responsibility Guide and Letters

By: Clare Birtles - Updated: 29 Jun 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Parental Responsibility Guide Father

This is our first guide and letter template pack, in a series of six. It is intended to help you understand Parental Responsibility and the rights and responsibilities that come with it. In addition when you download there are 12 letters which you can adapt to use in a whole host of circumstances.

The guide includes comprehensive detail on numerous Parental Responsibility considerations and issues including:

  • What Parental Responsibility is, how long it lasts and can it be taken away
  • How to obtain Parental Responsibility
  • Parental Responsibility agreements and orders
  • Decisions made by you/your ex and what to do if you don't agree
  • When your child is old enough to make certain decisions
  • Mediation
  • Specific issue orders and prohibited steps orders

If you want to download this guide (for example to print it off),

You can you can do so here. Or you can read it below:

Parental Responsibility (PR) is the term used to describe the rights, authority, powers, responsibilities and duties parents can have when it comes to looking after their children.

PR encompasses all of the decisions parents make for their children throughout their childhood. There is no exhaustive list of what these responsibilities, rights, duties and powers are, but they can include:

  • Naming the child
  • Raising the child is a safe and secure environment
  • Making decisions on any religious or cultural upbringing
  • Deciding where and how a child is to be educated and having access to his or her school reports and records
  • Access to a child's medical records and making decisions regarding any medical treatment they may need to undergo
  • Deciding where a child will live
  • Ensuring that the child is suitably fed and clothed
  • Disciplining the child
  • Taking the child outside England and Wales and consenting to the child's emigration
  • Consenting to a child entering marriage aged 16 or 17 years
Note:
* More than one person can have PR at any given time.* All adults with PR have an equal say in the child's upbringing.

Do I Have a Right To Parental Responsibility?

Fathers do not really have a specific right to see their children or to have PR. Instead, the law focuses on PR and the rights and duties it gives a parent.
PR is a legal status that means you have a duty and the authority to look after your child.
PR gives you a right to contribute towards the upbringing of your child in a safe and secure environment.

If you have PR, this does not mean you can override the mother's wishes and decisions, or her right to make everyday decisions concerning the child. Mothers and fathers should try to agree on decisions regarding the child together. If major issues cannot be agreed upon, you will most likely end up in court and a judge will determine the outcome.

It should be noted that once or if you have PR, you do not obtain any extra rights to see your child.

Do I Have Parental Responsibility?

In the UK, mothers always have automatic PR for their children. Fathers however, do not necessarily have PR.

Married to Child's Mother: If you were married to your child's mother at the time your child was born, or you subsequently marry the mother of your child, you will automatically have acquired PR. You will not lose PR if you and your (ex) wife later divorce. Once acquired, PR is permanent.

Unmarried and child born after 1/12/2003:If you were unmarried when your child was born, and he or she was born on or after 01 December 2003, and you are named on the birth certificate, you will automatically have PR. (You should note that you will be unable to register your name on the birth certificate without the mother's express permission.)

Residence Order:If you have a Residence Order determining where and with whom the child is to live with, you will automatically have acquired PR, if you do not already have it. It is not possible to have a residence order without also having PR. PR will continue until the order ceases, if it is obtained as a result of a residence order.

If I don't have parental responsibility how can I get it?

There are two ways of obtaining PR for your child, if you do not acquire it automatically:

1. A Parental responsibility agreement

If you want to play an active part in the decision making throughout your child's upbringing and be entitled to help make important decisions, you can enter into a 'Parental Responsibility Agreement' with the mother.

A Parental Responsibility Agreement bestows PR upon you, regardless of the fact that you are no longer in a relationship with the mother. A Parental Responsibility Agreement is a legal agreement which must be signed by both the mother and yourself.

You will need to complete form CPRA (1) parental responsibility agreement (the signatures need to be filled in in black ink) before you go to court. You then need to go to your local Family Proceedings Court, County Court, or the Principal Registry of the Family Division in London, with the child's mother, so that both of your signatures can be witnessed by an authorised member of court staff.

The child's mother must take along the child's full birth certificate to prove that she is her mother. Both you and the mother will also need to take photographic and signature ID, such as a passport or your full driving licence.

When your completed application form has been witnessed, you have to send the original paperwork along with two photocopies to: The Principal Registry of the Family Division, First Avenue House, 42-49 High Holborn, London, WC1 6NP.

Once this has been processed, you and the child's mother will each receive a sealed copy of the agreement and the original will remain at court on the court file. The agreement will take effect when it is recorded in London.

You should seek legal advice from a solicitor where possible, before entering into such an agreement.

2. A Parental responsibility order

If the child's mother does not agree to you having PR for the child, you could apply for a 'Parental Responsibility Order' through the courts. This order will state that a specific named person, i.e. you, have PR for your child. It is then shared between yourself and the child's mother, and any other person that has PR for your child.

You will need to show that you are the child's father before PR is granted and will most likely be directed to apply for a 'declaration of parentage' to confirm that you are the father.

If you apply through the courts, the judge will want to be clear on why you want to have PR and will look at a number of things, including:

  • Your relationship with the child
  • How you already provide for the child, financially, physically and emotionally
  • How you want to be able to provide for the child in the future
  • Your reasons for wanting PR
  • What is in the child's best interests

Can I have parental responsibility for my child even if he/she does Not live with me?

The short answer is yes!

If you have PR, you have a right to be involved in your child's upbringing, even if he or she does not live with you anymore. Where your child lives is irrelevant to your PR status.

The child's mother make the decisions regarding his or her everyday life, such as bed times, mealtimes, watching television, attendances at clubs etc and you cannot tell her how to make these more minor decisions. But for other more important things, such as which school your child goes to, what medical treatment he or she has, what religion if any they follow and so on, you have the same right to making decisions as the mother.

Are there any limitations on the decisions I can make by myself?

PR is shared equally between every person with PR for the child. Theoretically, an individual with PR can make decisions about the child on their own if it is necessary and reasonable, given the circumstances.

Parent with day to day care, makes 'everyday' decisions: The parent with the day to day care of the child, whether this is the mother or father, will make the everyday decisions about the child, and should not be prevented from doing so by the non-resident parent.

Important decisions need permission from anyone else with PR: You cannot make important decisions about the upbringing of your child without permission from all other persons with PR, unless they delegate all of their power to you. Such important decisions include changing your child's surname, consenting to their marriage or adoption, and deciding whether he or she emigrates to another country.

You should consult the child's mother regarding any important decisions, in order to save recourse to the courts if / when disagreements arise. Once a decision has been made by the court, everyone with PR must do exactly what the judge has ordered and the power to make decisions for yourself will have been taken away from you. It should be noted that the court is very unlikely to want to interfere in the more minor and trivial decisions that parents should be able to agree upon between themselves.

When the child is old enough to make certain decisions:As your child gets older, he or she may want to make decisions for themselves. If they have the capacity do so, your full input and PR may diminish. This does not mean that you no longer have PR, but that your child is competent to make certain decisions on their own. It is therefore important to include your child in making important decisions as they get older. If you don't and the matter ends up in court, the courts could deem the child able to make the decision without your permission if he or she fully understands the situation. Simply put, if your child is capable of consenting, they have a right to be consulted over important decisions regarding their upbringing.

PR includes the right to refuse and/or consent to medical treatment for your child. However, if a doctor does not believe that the parents' decision is in the best interests of the child, he can make an application to the courts. Medical decision-making is one area that can place limits on your powers and rights.

What happens if I don't agree with decisions my ex-spouse/partner is making?

If you and your ex-wife or ex-partner disagree over the decisions surrounding the upbringing of your child, there are several ways of resolving them.

The most cost effective and straight forward way would be to resolve the matter directly between yourselves, each explaining their views and trying to reach a mutual decision.

Mediation:

If this does not work, you could attend mediation at a family mediation centre. Mediation is a way of resolving disputes without recourse to the courts. Typically, a mediator will help the parties to negotiate a settlement, without telling them what to do. You will maintain control of the proceedings and be able to reach a mutually satisfactory decision with your ex-partner. Mediation is completely confidential.

Specific issue order or prohibited steps order:

An alternative way of resolving issues is by going to court. You can either make an application for a 'Specific Issue Order' or a 'Prohibited Steps Order'.

A Specific Issue Order - allows the court to make decisions about issues that have arisen in connection with the exercise of PR. They usually relate to major aspects of a child's upbringing.

A Prohibited Steps Order - allows the court to make a ruling preventing one person with PR from doing a certain thing, such as changing the child's surname without the father's permission. It would then be the case that the specific step would only be allowed to be taken with the court's permission.

A specific issue order or prohibited steps order can only be made in relation to child under the age of 16 years.

How long does parental responsibility last for?

PR automatically comes to an end when the child reaches 18 years of age. At this point, the child will become an adult and can make their own decisions about their future. A PR Order from the court will also end automatically when the child reaches 18 years of age.

If PR is given to you through the implementation of a residence order, your PR will come to an end when the residence order ends.

Can my parental responsibility be taken away from me?

It is extremely difficult to remove PR from a parent once they have acquired it.

If you were unmarried and gained PR by the registration of your name as the father on your child's birth certificate, it can only be removed by a court order, a court application by another adult with PR for the child, or the child's own application if he or she is old enough to understand the proceedings and their implications.

Occasionally, a PR order or parental responsibility agreement can be brought to an end by the court, but the welfare of the child will be the judge's first and foremost consideration when deciding whether to do this or not. PR is usually only removed from a parent if there is risk of serious harm or injury to the child.

To accompany this guide, we have a series of letter templates for you to use.

And Finally...

We know that some of the dads on here don't have much spare cash. So we are offering the downloadable guides for free.

To help us develop more guides and other products to help separated dads we would really appreciate a small PayPal donation. Our content is written by a qualified barrister. It would really help us and we would appreciate it.

Download the Pack for Free!

You can Download The Parental Responsibility Guide and Letters Here.

We hope that we can help you in some small way with your Parental Responsibility application or questions.

Check out the Separated Dads Forum... It's a great resource where you can ask for advice on topics including Child Access, Maintenance, CAFCASS, Fathers Rights, Court, Behaviour or simply to have a chat with other dads.

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Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
[Add a Comment]
I would like my girls to get christened . My girls have a care order but live with me. The baby has no care order. Through court my husband had withdrawn all responsibility for his children. Do I by law have to inform him of my intentions to have my girls baptised?
Sanne - 9-Apr-17 @ 1:53 PM
I have a Consent Order for my Daughter which states that I should pay support for her until she is 17 or leaves full time education, which ever is first.My Daughter is current studying a NVQ, NVQ's cannot be full time by there nature (vocational qualification). The Law changed recently which states that all children should be in education until the age of 18, do I still need to support my Daughter financially.
PaulA - 29-Mar-17 @ 1:50 PM
I'm trying to word a letter stating that I can look after grandson more than I can my daughter that's why I wanna go for full custody of my grandsons he don't go in foster care
Squib - 26-Mar-17 @ 12:33 AM
None - Your Question:
My son is presently unable to make contact with his partner and baby (it's just over 2 weeks since she left). No forthcoming information is available from her family. He despartely wants to see the baby, we have had advice regarding the possibility of mediation and or failing the success of this attempt to seek alternate advise from a solicitor. However would either of these methods be useful or successful should the mother be staying in a women's refuge centre? As a grandparent my heart weighs heavy with the awfullness of the situation and the great sadness endured by the present actions of others. I would so appreciate any advice or support regarding this matter and how to deal with it in a just manner that would we all hope bring about a positive outcome. How would you deal with this situation? Would my son given these circumstances manage to achieve an amicable outcome to see his daughter in the future?

Our Response:
I am sorry to hear this. If your son can afford a solicitor in the first instance, some advice and a letter to his ex suggesting mediation and outlining his actions may open up some sort of negotiation. However, if his ex refuses, then court is his only remaining option. The sooner he pushes for contact, the better (regardless of where his ex is living). If he cannot afford legal fees to take the matter to court, he can self litigate, please see link here. It's always a tricky subject to advise on, as much depends upon the background circumstances. If your son can develop an amicable relationship with his ex and try to be supportive, then this is always the most beneficial all round, please see link here . All the other pages in the Separated Dads series and our forum, should also help should he need any direct questions answering.
SeparatedDads - 21-Mar-17 @ 2:27 PM
My son is presently unable to make contact with his partner and baby (it's just over 2 weeks since she left). No forthcoming information is available from her family. He despartely wants to see the baby, we have had advice regarding the possibility of mediation and or failing the success of this attempt to seek alternate advise from a solicitor. However would either of these methods be useful or successful should the mother be staying in a women's refuge centre? As a grandparent my heart weighs heavy with the awfullness of the situation and the great sadness endured by the present actions of others. I would so appreciate any advice or support regarding this matter and how to deal with it in a just manner that would we all hope bring about a positive outcome. How would you deal with this situation? Would my son given these circumstances manage to achieve an amicable outcome to see his daughter in the future?
None - 20-Mar-17 @ 11:40 PM
Hello I'm in need of advice urgently!! My ex partner is basically telling me I am going to lose my rights to our son, in a previous message she has said she has a legal team in place for me to relinquish my rights to her. I basically told her I would not do that. So the reply I got was I've waited 21months I can wait another 3. I just need To know what she means by this, and where I stand. Please feel free to ask me anything
Fergle101 - 6-Mar-17 @ 7:54 PM
Sam123 - Your Question:
Hi, my partner is currently not in contact with his child, due to the mother being in breach of a court order, and not letting him see him. We are proceeding through another court order to get contact back. In the meantime, we have contacted the school to request copy of his most recent school photographs, and they have denied him, and said he does not have parental responsibility, yet he is on his child's birth certificate named as the father, which was registered after December 2003. Which we are certain gives him PR? Do the school have the right not to let him have them?

Our Response:
School and local authority staff must treat all parents equally, unless there is a court order limiting an individual's exercise of parental responsibility. Individuals who have parental responsibility for, or care of, a child have the same rights as natural parents; for example: •to receive information, e.g. pupil reports, to participate in statutory activities; e.g. vote in elections for parent governors, to be asked to give consent; e.g. to the child taking part in school trips and to be informed about meetings involving the child; e.g. a governors' meeting on the child's exclusion. Please see link here which will explain all you need to know.
SeparatedDads - 10-Feb-17 @ 2:12 PM
Hi, my partner is currently not in contact with his child, due to the mother being in breach of a court order, and not letting him see him. We are proceeding through another court order to get contact back. In the meantime, we have contacted the school to request copy of his most recent school photographs, and they have denied him, and said he does not have parental responsibility, yet he is on his child's birth certificate named as the father, which was registered after December 2003. Which we are certain gives him PR? Do the school have the right not to let him have them?
Sam123 - 9-Feb-17 @ 3:58 PM
I have a court order allowing me to see my 3 children every other weekend and for a week at Christmas.They are aged 9 12 and the oldest is nearly 16. They have said they don't want to come as often amy more because they are missing out on things like football, scouts and other such activities as well as being with their friends when they are with me. Their mom says they scream and shout and don't want to come and they have told me themselves.Can I force them if I have a court order?
Jacko - 1-Jan-17 @ 1:10 AM
How long to receive my court order after my my children case concluded by the judge that was on the 20 Sept but still waiting for the court order from the court, am just desperate to see my lovely boys
Baba - 1-Oct-16 @ 10:36 AM
My son lives with me and doesn't see his father on a regular basis. Can my son decide to come on holiday with me before he reaches 16 this would only be within a month of his birthday.When he is 16 years old do I need his fathers consent to take him on holiday.
mother - 26-Jul-16 @ 11:29 AM
Jimmy John- Your Question:
How much does a solicitor charge for a letter to be sent to my ex partner regarding contact with my son?

Our Response:
You would have to consult a solicitor directly, as pricing may be different depending upon the level of the solicitor used and the specific company fees.
SeparatedDads - 22-Jul-16 @ 12:23 PM
How much does a solicitor charge for a letter to be sent to my ex partner regarding contact with my son?
Jimmy John - 20-Jul-16 @ 10:31 PM
jodie - Your Question:
Hi my brother and his ex split a few years ago and my brother has his son full time and he get the benefits eyc for him they both have a history or drugs but his ex is more recent than him. My nephew is well looked after and social services are happy with his care. But the mother has said she is going to court to get him full time and wouldnt allow my brother (or any of our side) to see him anymore when she gets him. Is it possible for her to gain full access again after my brother has had him full time for a year and claims for him etc. Thanks

Our Response:
It is highly unlikely the court would take your brother's child from him if the child is stable, happy and has a consistent upbringing. The court will always act on what it thinks is the best interests of the child and removing a child from the resident-parent is only ever done as a last resort.
SeparatedDads - 7-Jul-16 @ 3:07 PM
Hi my brother and his ex split a few years ago and my brother has his son full time and he get the benefits eyc for him they both have a history or drugs but his ex is more recent than him. My nephew is well looked after and social services are happy with his care. But the mother has said she is going to court to get him full time and wouldnt allow my brother (or any of our side) to see him anymore when she gets him. Is it possible for her to gain full access again after my brother has had him full time for a year and claims for him etc. Thanks
jodie - 7-Jul-16 @ 2:14 AM
coy1 - Your Question:
Could someone please help me?? I see my son every other weekend, I pay child maintenance without fail! my ex wife will not bring him to see me or pick him up. I drive 1 hour each way to collect and drop him off which is costing me a fortune and I simply can not afford the petrol money to do BOTH runs anymore. I asked for my ex wife to do 1 trip o which she has undeniably refused to do. This is now a massive problem as I will struggle to see my son no. Does she have a responsibility in ensuring my son sees me? I am desperate to see him and he loves me and cries down the phone to me asking why his mum wont bring him to see me. someone please help.

Our Response:
If you are paying child maintenance you may be able to request a 'special expenses variation', please see link here for more information. Otherwise your only other option is to suggest mediation in order to sort the issue out, or apply to court.
SeparatedDads - 11-May-16 @ 1:43 PM
could someone please help me?? I see my son every other weekend, i pay child maintenance without fail! my ex wife will not bring him to see me or pick him up. i drive 1 hour each way to collect and drop him off which is costing me a fortune and i simply can not afford the petrol money to do BOTH runs anymore. i asked for my ex wife to do 1 trip o which she has undeniably refused to do. This is now a massive problem as i will struggle to see my son no.... Does she have a responsibility in ensuring my son sees me? I am desperate to see him and he loves me and cries down the phone to me asking why his mum wont bring him to see me... someone please help..
coy1 - 10-May-16 @ 5:32 PM
Ickers - Your Question:
I had a court order say I can see my son which he's mother broke the order stopping me seeing him I then took her back to court and had the order enforced she was given 40 hours of unpaid work suspended for a year which is finished now but still she break the enforced order I have spent over £20,000 in fees to see my son now I have to take her back to court this has not only drained me financially but mentally where is the law which helps me because I'm pretty certain if I ever refused to give home back to he's mother I would be arrested

Our Response:
If your ex has significantly broken the order again I suggest you take the matter back to court. See link: Breach of Contact or Residence Order: What to Do, here. If it is a serious breach the court will be less lenient on her, therefore it is worth making sure your access is secured. If you can't afford the legal fees you can self-litigate, please see link here. Many fathers are having a good amount of success this way, if they prepare their cases well. Rather than keeping your child against the wishes of your ex (which can backfire) I would take the legal route. The fact your ex has continued to flout the terms of the order wont be looked upon lightly in court, this is why you should attempt to once again have the order enforced. Make sure you log every breach of the order and research your case well. Our forum may help as a good support network for you, as many dads may have been through the same, so can advise. I shall also put your question on our Separated Dads Facebook page, and our dads may be able to give you some further advice, so please access the page for answers.
SeparatedDads - 6-May-16 @ 11:30 AM
I had a court order say I can see my son which he's mother broke the order stopping me seeing him I then took her back to court and had the order enforced she was given 40 hours of unpaid work suspended for a year which is finished now but still she break the enforced order I have spent over £20,000 in fees to see my son now I have to take her back to court this has not only drained me financially but mentally where is the law which helps me because I'm pretty certain if I ever refused to give home back to he's mother I would be arrested
Ickers - 5-May-16 @ 2:49 PM
Dulie100 - Your Question:
Hi, I have done everything to accommodate my ex's need and always had to do things her way just to make it easier to see my son. I am limited to sit in her parents back room whilst constantly watched and judged. She won't allow me to take him for a walk but she wants to take him away on holiday for two weeks. I'm sure I have rights to take him out as she takes him out all the time and isn't breastfeeding so nothing stopping me. As a father do I have rights to do so.

Our Response:
You have rights as a father yes, but if the mother will not allow you to take your son out, then you would have to apply through the courts to let the court decide. Please see page: Contact Orders: the Process, here. The courts do want fathers to have a good relationship with their children, so therefore it is worth taking this route, and once the court issues a court order, your ex will have to abide by its terms.
SeparatedDads - 3-May-16 @ 3:04 PM
Hi, I have done everything to accommodate my ex's need and always had to do things her way just to make it easier to see my son. I am limited to sit in her parents back room whilst constantly watched and judged. She won't allow me to take him for a walk but she wants to take him away on holiday for two weeks. I'm sure I have rights to take him out as she takes him out all the time and isn't breastfeeding so nothing stopping me. As a father do I have rights to do so.
Dulie100 - 1-May-16 @ 5:56 PM
ray - Your Question:
Hello my ex is trying to take me to court he is unfit to be father, as Drinks anD takes Drugs also has history of violence towards me anD other people is there any way he can take me to court when can not contact me or know my address many thanks

Our Response:
Regardless of his background and history, he can take you to court for access. If you have decided to keep your address from your ex so he cannot locate you, the court can put a trace on you. However, this does not mean your ex will find out your address, you can apply for this to remain confidential. It just means it allows the court to find you child's/childrens' whereabouts so he can apply to the courts. Whether future access is allowed or not by the judge, every father has the right to apply for it.
SeparatedDads - 9-Mar-16 @ 10:40 AM
Hello my ex is trying to take me to court he is unfit to be father, as Drinks anD takes Drugs also has history of violence towards me anD other people is there any way he can take me to court when can not contact me or know my address many thanks
ray - 8-Mar-16 @ 12:07 AM
Hi my brothers ex partner moved away with my niece over 3 years ago now and we've just finally found her address, how do we/he go about getting official contact with our niece/his daughter as she moved away on a bad note and I assume doesn't want to be found?
Help :( - 29-Feb-16 @ 9:15 PM
SH - Your Question:
My ex-wife and I divorced when my twin boys were 7 years old, which was 11 years ago, we have always had 50/50 with them, recently as they have got girlfriends and a social life they spend the majority of time with their Mother, it is also easier for one of them to get to college from their Mothers home. They are now 18 years old and were both in further education, one of them recently dropped out of further education and has got a full time job, I therefore advised their Mother I would be reducing the maintenance by 50%, she has hit the roof, saying as they no longer spend as much time with me, I have not been paying enough for quite a while and she intends to go through CSA to get a fairer payment for the child who is still in further education. I would appreciate your opinion, I am not refusing to pay for the child who is still in further education and I accept he doesnt spend as much time with me over the last year.

Our Response:
If your child of 18 is earning, then as you quite rightly say, you no longer need to pay maintenance for him. However, regardless of whether you see your other child or not, you still are responsible for his day-to-day maintenance. You can see how much you should be paying for your child in education via the link here. I hope this helps.
SeparatedDads - 16-Feb-16 @ 2:46 PM
My ex-wife and I divorced when my twin boys were 7 years old, which was 11 years ago, we have always had 50/50 with them, recently as they have got girlfriends and a social life they spend the majority of time with their Mother, it is also easier for one of them to get to college from their Mothers home. They are now 18 years old and were both in further education, one of them recently dropped out of further education and has got a full time job, I therefore advised their Mother I would be reducing the maintenance by 50%, she has hit the roof, saying as they no longer spend as much time with me, I have not been paying enough for quite a while and she intends to go through CSA to get a fairer payment for the child who is still in further education. I would appreciate your opinion, I am not refusing to pay for the child who is still in further education and I accept he doesnt spend as much time with me over the last year.
SH - 16-Feb-16 @ 1:33 PM
B123 - Your Question:
My childs dad is in the birth certificate n my son was born after 2003. He never sees is son and I got a court order so his not aloud near us, he hasn't seen him in over 2years. I want to take pr off him , can I do that? Also I want to change his last name to mine but I herd after three years I do not need his permission and I can do it by de-pole, any help?

Our Response:
It is rare that a court will revoke PR from one parent unless there is a very good reason. You can change your child's name without your ex's consent only if you cannot get in touch or locate your ex, please see link here.
SeparatedDads - 3-Feb-16 @ 12:30 PM
My childs dad is in the birth certificate n my son was born after 2003. He never sees is son and I got a court order so his not aloud near us, he hasn't seen him in over 2years. I want to take pr off him , can I do that? Also I want to change his last name to mine but I herd after three years I do not need his permission and I can do it by de-pole, any help?
B123 - 2-Feb-16 @ 10:03 PM
gaffer - Your Question:
My wife and I have separated at xmas due to her have an affair I have asked her not to introduce our son to this man as I feel it's to early as we have only just separated she has said that I have no say in it its her decision that she can introduce him to this man at this stage, where do I stand on this?

Our Response:
I am sorry to hear this. It is up to your ex to decide whether she wants to introduce this man to your son. If you have good reason why you do not wish for this (not just because you dislike him), then you may have the option to apply for a Specific Issue thorugh the courts, please see link here. However, the courts will have expected you to consider solving this issue by Mediation first, which does cost a lot less too. Please see link: Mediation: What is it and is it For Me? here.
SeparatedDads - 1-Feb-16 @ 12:58 PM
My wife and I have separated at xmas due to her have an affair I have asked her not to introduce our son to this man as I feel it's to early as we have only just separated she has said that I have no say in it its her decision that she can introduce him to this man at this stage, where do I stand on this?
gaffer - 31-Jan-16 @ 8:30 PM
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