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Matrimonial Home: What Are My Rights?

By: Lorna Elliott LLB (hons), Barrister - Updated: 21 Feb 2018 |
 
Marriage Divorce Maintenance Payment

Q.

My wife has told me she wants to separate after 5 years of marriage and move into rented accommodation. When I met her she moved into my house and not long after started maternity leave. Sadly, our son was born with a disability and she therefore hasn't worked since he was born. She receives approx £500 per month carer's allowance plus other usual benefits.

The matrimonial home is in my sole name and I have therefore paid the mortgage, bills and generally maintained the property in good order. I'm devastated she has made this decision but now need to know where I stand legally regarding the house and spousal maintenance.

Obviously, I have no issues whatsoever with regard to maintenance for my child, and am more than happy to pay this and still want to be a part of his life.

Any advice please.

(JB, 13 April 2010)

A.

I am sorry to hear that your wife has decided that your marriage is over. I note what you say about the fact that the property (which lawyers call the FMH or Former Matrimonial Home) is and always has been in your sole name. This does not necessarily mean that your wife would not have a claim to some share in the equity in the property. While it is right that your wife has not contributed financially to the property, she has managed the household for the time that you have been married and, most importantly, brought up your disabled son. The law recognises in marriage and other partnerships that while one person might be the breadwinner the other spouse contributes to the marriage in other non-financial ways.

Maintenance Payments

While you mention that your wife is currently in receipt of carer's allowance and other benefits, you do not mention whether you are paying her anything by way of maintenance at the moment. Although recent events will have been understandably upsetting for you, it does sound as though you and your wife are reasonably amicable about your separation. If you can both agree on terms for Maintenance Payments for your son, and any other financial arrangements, you and your wife may have a relatively straightforward divorce.

The Law

Of course, you should be aware that your wife may go to a solicitor at any time and be advised independently as to her legal options. I do not know your financial circumstances but her lawyer may advise her that she is entitled to a share of the equity in the family home. At this point you may want to consider your own circumstances. Would you be in a position to offer her a lump sum? Have you and your wife talked at all about making provision for your son or any maintenance payments for your wife? Would you be prepared to make any kind of offer?

Your Wife’s Rights to the Property

Similarly, your wife could register an interest in the property at the Land Registry, which would mean you could not take a secured loan against or sell your home without her permission. This is quite commonplace in situations in which the marital home is in one person’s name only.

I’ve tried to outline basic principles here, but my advice to you is to go and see a family solicitor asap. You don’t need to tell your wife that you’re consulting a lawyer, but could just find out what your options are at this stage. Good luck.

Check out our expert's answer to when an ex changes the locks on a jointly owned property.

Check out the Separated Dads Forum... It's a great resource where you can ask for advice on topics including Child Access, Maintenance, CAFCASS, Fathers Rights, Court, Behaviour or simply to have a chat with other dads.

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[Add a Comment]
Annie - Your Question:
My husband and I’ve in Manchester we bought a second home nearby to remodel which too 3 years. While I was in hospital my husband asked me to sign the house over to his name as I was I’ll and he said it was easier if he needed to take a loan out for remodelling. A year later the house was done and I’m back to normal. He said the house was taking a while to sell but I found a letter saying house has been sold and he has put the money into another account I didn’t know about without my knowledge. We are married with no children have been for 15 years I think he is getting ready to leave hence the reason for trying to hid the assets. What can I do about this?

Our Response:
You would need to seek legal advice, only a court can help resolve this matter.If your ex is found to have tried to sideline finances and/or deprive you of the share of a marital asset, the courts will take this seriously.
SeparatedDads - 22-Feb-18 @ 11:23 AM
My husband and I’ve in Manchester we bought a second home nearby to remodel which too 3 years. While I was in hospital my husband asked me to sign the house over to his name as I was I’ll and he said it was easier if he needed to take a loan out for remodelling. A year later the house was done and I’m back to normal. He said the house was taking a while to sell but I found a letter saying house has been sold and he has put the money into another account I didn’t know about without my knowledge . We are married with no children have been for 15 years I think he is getting ready to leave hence the reason for trying to hid the assets. What can I do about this?
Annie - 21-Feb-18 @ 8:37 AM
Certa Ceta - Your Question:
We have been married for 35 years. We have no children from the marriage. However, my wife has one adult child from a previous marriage and I have three adult children from a previous marriage. Although I provided the deposit and have paid the mortgage (completed) and all the utility bills for the entire time of our marriage the marital home is in my wife's sole name. She is refusing to return our home to joint ownership. I fear she intends to disinherit my children and leave all to her daughter, when I die. I am nine years older than my wife and in poor health. How can I ensure all the children from our previous marriages get equal shares? Without risking my wife becoming homeless.

Our Response:
Your only option would be to apply to court, if you cannot resolve this issue between yourselves.
SeparatedDads - 20-Feb-18 @ 3:04 PM
We have been married for 35 years. We have no children from the marriage. However, my wife has one adult child from a previous marriage and Ihave three adult children from a previous marriage. Although I provided the deposit and have paid the mortgage (completed) and all the utility bills for the entire time of our marriage the marital home is in my wife's sole name. She is refusing to return our home to joint ownership. I fear she intends to disinherit my children and leave all to her daughter, when I die. I am nine years older than my wife and in poor health. How can I ensure all the children from our previous marriages get equal shares? Without risking my wife becoming homeless.
Certa Ceta - 20-Feb-18 @ 5:11 AM
I separated from ex partner(not married) 3 years ago we have 2 children and we did have a joint mortgage together. when we split up she didn't want the house so i brought her out via a solicitor, land registry and the mortgage company. so now the house is solely in my name. my question is, is there any way that my ex could have claim to my property even though she legally took payment for her share of the property and was removed from mortgage and deeds of property?
steve - 16-Feb-18 @ 4:07 PM
giggs - Your Question:
I moved out of our house, and have been renting for 3 years now. We were married for 3 years, with the house in both our names. As I was earning more, I paid for the mortgage and bills (and put down the deposit too with my life savings). I feel that my ex is looking for more money than she contributed, and cannot see past the fact that the mortgage is very cheap, whilst I am continuing to pay 'dead' rental money. As there is only maybe 60k equity in the house, should I just settle for 50-50% split? I feel that there will be problems just round the corner too, as I'm sure the bank wont allow us to have just her name on it, with a low salary

Our Response:
You don't say whether you have children together or not. If you do, then you are looking at a more even split, if your ex agrees to sell. Otherwise, a court may allow her to remain in the house if she is the primary carer of your children. However, if you have no children and the marriage has been short, then you may be entitled to request your deposit back as it could be considered non-marital. At the same time, you might just wish to come to an agreement that suits you both and which you can agree to without having to pay legal professionals to sort it out in court. You may wish to seek legal/professional advice though in order to fully explore your options.
SeparatedDads - 2-Feb-18 @ 1:56 PM
I moved out of our house, and have been renting for 3 years now. We were married for 3 years, with the house in both our names. As I was earning more, I paid for the mortgage and bills (and put down the deposit too with my life savings). I feel that my ex is looking for more money than she contributed, and cannot see past the fact that the mortgage is very cheap, whilst I am continuing to pay 'dead' rental money. As there is only maybe 60k equity in the house, should I just settle for 50-50% split? I feel that there will be problems just round the corner too, as I'm sure the bank wont allow us to have just her name on it, with a low salary
giggs - 31-Jan-18 @ 10:40 PM
Hi I'm divorced but I still have a house with a joint mortgage with my ex. It's in negative equity and she has not paid anything for 6 years. Where do I stand? I want to get rid of it but feel I'm stuck and she thinks she is entitled to money when I sell it!
Baz - 28-Jan-18 @ 6:18 AM
@Johny1977 - you can counter-sue! As you could have a claim on her house, especially if you put money into it for refurbishment and paid the mortgage. If the marriage was short (under five years) then she has little claim, unless you have kids. If you take the matter to court though, any money that you both could have will go into the solicitor's pockets, so keep out of court if you can. But by the sounds of it, she doesn't have a leg to stand on and is just being plain greedy. Seek legal advice and ask a solicitor to send an equally as damning letter. Then she might back off.
CharlieVF - 25-Jan-18 @ 3:52 PM
My wife committed adultery after 5 months of marriage and we are now in the process of divorce. We purchased a house a year before we got married and lived In it for 5 months as a married couple until I found out she was commiting adultery at which point she left and stopped paying anything towards the mortgage or the upkeep. I put in a much higher deposit to the house and now she is coming after half of the equity... is this allowed? She also has her own house that she kept and I paid more of the mortgage on the joint house to enable her to do this as well as paying for large renovations in the house before we were married. Where do I stand with what she is entitled to as it does not seem in anyway fair that she can contribute so little and expect to take so much after she walked out on the marriage after such a short time.
Johny1977 - 23-Jan-18 @ 10:24 PM
Sam - Your Question:
My wife and I have been separated for 6 years but not divorced. I am now ready for devorce. Will she be entitled to my pension and the assets that I have accrued during the separation period? I have been paying mentainance for our 2 kids for the 6 years.

Our Response:
Your wife may be entitled to a share of your pension. But she will not be entitled to assets you have accrued during the separation period, unless joint money has been used to fund those assets. Mediation may help you to come to a mutual decision, please see link here.
SeparatedDads - 23-Jan-18 @ 10:13 AM
My wife and I have been separated for 6 years but not divorced. I am now ready for devorce. Will she be entitled to my pension and the assets that I have accrued during the separation period? I have been paying mentainance for our 2 kids for the 6 years.
Sam - 22-Jan-18 @ 12:34 PM
Andy- Your Question:
After 7 years marriage and several years in a relationship before that my wife said she wanted us to separate. We have 2 children. 16 and 6. She always managed the finances, she didn't work and I always was the provider. I moved out about 6 months ago. She is starting divorce proceedings, she wants me to pay maintenance for the children and the mortgage. I was paying all the bills but she said I wouldn't have to once we're divorced. Her parents did give us alot towards out house deposit when we bought. She has said that once the children are 18 and we sell the house she wants me to take 40% of the equity to her 60%.The question is:Is this reasonable?Is it the norm that I pay the mortgage until both children are 18 even if her circumstances change?Is it normal to pay the mortgage for all those years and still she gets that amount of equity?What would you advise, I haven't seen a solicitor as yet. I have been trying to keep things amicable but feel like she's taking advantage.

Our Response:
We cannot comment upon what is a fair financial split as much depends upon what both of your finances are and what you 'both' agree to/think is fair. In a situation where you cannot agree, then mediation is the next step, please see link here . You may find our Separated Dads forum useful if you wish to have a selection of opinions which may help you with an overall view. If you work out your child maintenance payments, which can be done via the link here and assess whether you 'can' afford to pay the mortgage as well (taking into consideration your own living costs), then this may answer your question. Both parent's finances have to be taken into account while keeping first and foremost in your mind what is in the best interests of the children. All variations should be rationally contemplated before you bow to any demands.
SeparatedDads - 12-Jan-18 @ 9:55 AM
After 7 years marriage and several years in a relationship before that my wife said she wanted us to separate.We have 2 children.16 and 6. She always managed the finances, she didn't work and I always was the provider.I moved out about 6 months ago. She is starting divorce proceedings, she wants me to pay maintenance for the children and the mortgage.I was paying all the bills but she said I wouldn't have to once we're divorced. Her parents did give us alot towards out house deposit when we bought.She has said that once the children are 18 and we sell the house she wants me to take 40% of the equity to her60%. The question is: Is this reasonable? Is it the norm that I pay the mortgage until both children are 18 even if her circumstances change? Is it normal to pay the mortgage for all those years and still she gets that amount of equity? What would you advise, I haven't seen a solicitor as yet. I have been trying to keep things amicable but feel like she's taking advantage.
Andy - 11-Jan-18 @ 3:22 PM
David - Your Question:
Hi my wife and I have decided to divorce. The house is in her name and she recently added her brothers name but mortgage is in her name only. She works part time as she cares for our three young children. I work full time. I pay into the mortgage and bills and she pays for the rest of the items. Do I have a chance to claim my share of the house? We have been married for 13 years

Our Response:
If you are married, much depends upon whether your wife purchased the house before marriage and how long you have been married etc. For instance, if your wife owned the house before the marriage, the property can be considered a non-marital asset. Under five years is considered to be a short marriage, in which the property may revert back to your wife. The longer the marriage, the more the other party will have a claim to the 'non-marital asset'. So, if you bought the property together at the beginning of your marriage, regardless of whose name the property is in, it will still be considered a 'marital' asset. However, there is another issue to consider and that is your three young children. When a family issue such as this is decided in court, the emphasis is always put on the children, and it is unlikely a court would force your wife to sell the house while your children are school age. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the children in question. The court will always put the children’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order. Therefore, any financial negotiations are best carried out between you and your wife, while keeping the children's interests in mind. Getting a court involved will hit you both financially - so mutual negotiation are always encouraged first. You may wish to seek legal advice.
SeparatedDads - 11-Jan-18 @ 10:29 AM
Hi my wife and I have decided to divorce. The house is in her name and she recently added her brothers name butmortgage is in her name only. She works part time as she cares for our three young children. I work full time. I pay into the mortgage and bills and she pays for the rest of the items. Do I have a chance to claim my share of the house? We have been married for 13 years
David - 10-Jan-18 @ 1:08 PM
Bano - Your Question:
Hi, I am married with one natural child and a couple of step children. After years of emotional abuse and bullying I have decided I wish to leave. I wish for my natural son to come with me. I jointly own our property, we paid equal amounts of the deposit. If sold am I entitled to half the equity.

Our Response:
In the first instance, you would have to discuss this with your wife who may have a different viewpoint regarding who your natural son lives with. As a general/benchmark rule, a court would usually opt for the child to stay with the parent who is the day-to-day primary carer of your child. Keeping this in mind (as court is always seen as the last resort), negotiation and (if you can't negotiate mutually), mediation should be considered in order to come to an agreement, please see link here. A court will not allow you to apply for a court order unless mediation has first been explored. Likewise, you and your wife would have to agree on what happens to the house. If your wife agrees to selling the property, then you can work out the finances between you. If your wife doesn't agree, you then have a problem which only mediation or court can help solve. However, taking the matter to court will cost and there is no guarantee you will be successful. If your wife is the day-to-day carer of your child and wants to remain so, it's then that you have a problem and a disagreement to sort out. A court will usually allow the primary carer of the children to remain in the house. If your wife is wishes to remain the primary carer of your child and disagrees with your request to sell the house currently, then this will create a stumbling block that only court can sort out. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the child in question. The court will always put the child’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order. Keeping siblings together and keeping a consistent stable family unit is deemed to be in the child's best interests. Therefore, if you wish to pursue this matter, it is best to seek legal advice. A solicitor will help you explore your options.
SeparatedDads - 14-Dec-17 @ 10:35 AM
Hi, I am married with one natural child and a couple of step children.After years of emotional abuse and bullying I have decided I wish to leave.I wish for my natural son to come with me.I jointly own our property, we paid equal amounts of the deposit.If sold am I entitled to half the equity.
Bano - 13-Dec-17 @ 10:07 AM
@Jonny - You would have to sell, once her will/ estate was distrubuted on her death. If you attempt to stay without authorisation from your wife's ex/children, then a court could force you to move. If they take you to court, then this would be a big financial cost to you (and possibly them). Always best to keep to any prior legal arrangements made. AC.
AndyC - 12-Dec-17 @ 11:00 AM
What’s would be my rights to stay in my wife’s house should she die she owns half the other half her ex put into a trust for her grown up children
Jonny - 11-Dec-17 @ 3:27 PM
My son has been married for five yrs but lived with his partner for 30yrs.his wife has moved out of their home and demanded that they sell and split the sale money.my son is devastated.he has renovated 5 properties and always worked hard and complied with his wife's wishes. He has bought her anything she has wanted including 5 dogs and a modern car.they have no children.his wife is suffering from lupus and is menopausal and is being treated with medication for this.there is a lot of interference coming from her family and they have allowed her to stay with them.regarding my son he is gentle and hardworking and would have supported his wife with her problems.he stands to lose his home because she is bored with her life.
ariadne - 23-Nov-17 @ 6:05 PM
Marcus - Your Question:
Hi there, my wife had an affair early on in the year, we have tried to work things out but I suspected something going on. She didn't like the fact that I was acting like detective and looking into everything. Thus she has asked for us to separate but remain in the house because she only works part time and couldn't pay for the mortgage. If I divorce her, could the court force me to pay for the house even though I wouldn't be able to survive due to our debt level. I did suggest to her the better option is sell, leave equity in the children's bank accounts and she could apply for housing benefit and rent; is this possible or am about to become very poor.

Our Response:
By moving out, you will immediately put yourself at a disadvantage in terms of your rights, particularly if your wife is the primary carer of your children. A court can allow the primary carer of the children to remain in the house until the children leave full-time education. The fact both of you are under an obligation to pay the mortgage (as per the terms of the mortgage), a court could request you continue to pay this. Likewise, you will also be under an obligation to pay child maintenance once you leave the family home. You can see how much you may be paying via the link here. Many couples (for financial reasons) agree to live separately under the same roof until an agreement can be reached, or until finances allow. In addition, you would not be able to sell the house and sideline equity into your children's accounts, as (depending upon the amount) this could be seen as deprivation of capital. This would mean your wife would not be entitled to claim housing benefit, or other means-tested benefits. Sitting down with your wife to negotiate this and/or attending mediation may also help, please see link here . However, it is definitely recommended that you get further advice before you do, in order to fully explore all your options.
SeparatedDads - 13-Oct-17 @ 4:02 PM
Hi there, my wife had an affair early on in the year, we have tried to work things out but I suspected something going on. She didn't like the fact that I was acting like detective and looking into everything. Thus she has asked for us to separate but remain in the house because she only works part time and couldn't pay for the mortgage. If I divorce her, could the court force me to pay for the house even though I wouldn't be able to survive due to our debt level. I did suggest to her the better option is sell, leave equity in the children's bank accounts and she could apply for housing benefit and rent; is this possible or am about to become very poor.
Marcus - 13-Oct-17 @ 4:52 AM
CJ - Your Question:
My wife has just decided that she wants leave me after 18 years of marriage, We have a mortgage together and our 17 year old daughter still lives at home.l understand that she is entitled to a share in any equity in the property. My question is , as it is her that has decided to break up the marriage, and leave the marital home, can she make me move out, also as I am not in a position to offer a settlement can she make me sell ?

Our Response:
Much depends upon who becomes the primary carer of your daughter, as a court may rule that the house isn't sold and the primary carer and your daughter can stay in the house, until she finishes full-time education. However, that's only if it gets to court. A mutual financial arrangement and fair split is better when agreed by you both. Your wife cannot force you to move out and likewise you cannot force your wife. In fact many people agree to live under the same roof until a suitable arrangement can be arrived at. However, as specified in the article, your wife can force you to sell in order to release her share of the equity, if you refuse to negotiate. If you refuse and she applies to court, then this will cost a great deal more than if you can come to a mutual agreement. Mediation may be something for you both to consider, please see link here.
SeparatedDads - 9-Oct-17 @ 10:26 AM
My wife has just decided that she wants leave me after 18 years of marriage, We have a mortgage together and our 17 year old daughter still lives at home.l understand that she is entitled to a share in any equity in the property. My question is , as it is her that has decided to break up the marriage, and leave the marital home, can she make me move out, also asI am not in a position to offer a settlement can she make me sell ?
CJ - 8-Oct-17 @ 9:01 AM
@Xander77 - if the house has only gained £5K in equity, then request he takes you to court. It would cost more than £15K in legal fees. Plus you haven't been married long enough for him to have a case against you, and you are the primary carer of the kids which puts you at a distinct advantage. It's worth paying to see a solicitor though, so you are armed with the correct facts and what rights he has (re; pension) after such a short marriage. But, I don't think he has much of a leg to stand on.
Ash - 12-Sep-17 @ 11:01 AM
MRR67 - Your Question:
My wife finished our marriage of 18 years 20 months ago. I stayed within the family home but her behaviour meant I had to move out into rented accommodation.I have continued to pay for the mortgage as the house is in my sole name. There is approx 40K in equity with around 80K left on the mortgage.My wife has filed for divorce and we are at the Nisi stage.My wife now wants to take over the mortgage and keep all equity in it and take 40% of my pension with my contributions going to CMS.My solicitor is advising to listen to her offe and set a time limit on her offer.This would potentially mean I sign over a house I have paid for since the marriage started , lose all my equity and any further claim?My solicitor suggests this would stop any potentially expensive court hearings (15k plus) free me of my mortgage payments and liability to the former home. I would apply to the CMS as my children are teenagers.I have tried several times to go to mediation with my wife but she has not progressed any meetings we have had.I am concerned if I sign over the house I will not receive any monies from a house I have put 18 years effort into. Is this the best way to move to conclusion?

Our Response:
In effect, what your solicitor is saying is that if you take the matter to court, you may end up worse off. Your house may be in your sole name, but it is still considered a joint asset a) because of the length of your marriage, b) you may have paid for the mortgage, but who was the primary carer of your children from their birth to teenage years? If it was your wife and she earned less or not at all, then both you and she have worked jointly and contributed as a family team. I cannot advise you beyond what your solicitor has advised. If you feel the situation is unfair and you wish to fight it, then I advise you take a second opinion. However, if your children are teenagers and your wife is the primary carer of your children, then a court could order you to sign the house over to your wife if it thinks it is in your children's best interests. If your wife does not agree with you, then your only option is to apply to court. However, unfortunately the court may still not decide in your favour as it will always put the welfare of your children first. Much also depends upon whether your wife can afford to take on the mortgage, which also will make a difference to the outcome.
SeparatedDads - 11-Sep-17 @ 12:03 PM
Hi, my husband and I have separated after 5.5years of marriage. The marital home was bought with a deposit of £70k which my mum gave to me and I pay her the interest in it, we agreed a rate of interest similar to that she'd get if in a high interest account. this was drawn up as a legal document and witness signed at the time that it was a loan to me. we've remortgaged a couple of times since then to finance the two maternity leaves I took as my husband didn't earn enough to pay his debts and bills and run the house with me on SMP. The home is in my name and I have always paid the mortgage and all family bills. He did contribute every month but i always paid the larger share. We have two young children aged 2 and 4, I have almost full time responsibility with my ex having them every Friday night and every other Saturday, I pay all the childcare (1k a month and he simply pays me child manintenance, he doesn't contribute to the mortgage or any other bills since he moved out. He is now saying he wants half the equity - but it isn't mine to give him, he then said if I gave him 15k he would give me a clean break divorce. I'm at a loss as to what to do. The house hasn't gained much value, maybe 5k since I bought it. As I pay the lions share cost of looking after kids would this be factored into a divorce settlement? Would £15k be a good figure for me to pay him off? I'm a teacher and he's threatening to after my pension - what entitlement would he have to that? Any advice would be hugely appreciated.
Xander77 - 11-Sep-17 @ 12:24 AM
My wife finished our marriage of 18 years20 months ago. I stayed within the family home but her behaviour meant I had to move out into rented accommodation. I have continued to pay for the mortgage as the house is in my sole name. There isapprox 40K in equity with around 80K left on the mortgage. My wife has filed for divorce and we are at the Nisi stage. My wife now wants to take over the mortgage and keep all equity in it and take 40% of my pension with my contributions going to CMS. My solicitor is advising to listen to her offe and set a time limit on her offer. This would potentially mean I sign over a house I have paid for since the marriage started , lose all my equity and any further claim? My solicitor suggests this would stop any potentially expensive court hearings (15k plus) free me of my mortgage payments and liability to the former home. I would apply to the CMS as my children are teenagers. I have tried several times to go to mediation with my wife but she has not progressed any meetings we have had. I am concerned if I sign over the house I will not receive any monies from a house I have put 18 years effort into. Is this the best way to move to conclusion?
MRR67 - 10-Sep-17 @ 8:14 AM
i married my wife 7 years ago and she had 2 children to another marriage and i took them on as my own,They moved into my house and since then 5 years ago we both had a baby boy who is now 5,We had to move out of my 2 bed terraced for which i rented out and rented a bigger property,2 years ago the eldest left and now we seperated over 4months ago due to the younger boy who is now 16 not getting on with me and was always in my face goreding me to which my wife and 5 yr old witnessed,it got to the stage were for the sake of me not doing something stupid because of what the son was doing we agreed to split,i pay 90% of the bills inc rent and have now moved her and my son and her son into my 2 bed terraced because i could not afford the rent,i moved out and currently living in a caravan in a farmers field because i cannot afford to rent anywhere,i still pay the mortgage and 90% of the bills as well as buying for my son,at this moment i cannot see me being able to move out of the caravan,can anyone advise me on the best way forward,do i have to support my ex wife and her 16 yr old son,for my son i will provide everything but i am struggling
beefy - 8-Sep-17 @ 3:00 AM
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  • Chri
    Re: Divorce and Perjury
    And for the record ex I am on disability pension so I can’t help you sorry .and it not my problem anyway get step daddy to step up .you get…
    24 February 2018
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